X

Test-to-Treat* can help you get tested for COVID-19 and, if appropriate, receive treatment all in the same location.

*This link will take you to a website that is owned and operated by HHS. Pfizer is not responsible for the content or services of this site.

Find Locations1-800-232-0233 (TTY 888-720-7489)

Test-to-Treat* can help you get tested for COVID-19 and, if appropriate, receive treatment all in the same location.

*These links will take you to a website that is owned and operated by HHS. Pfizer is not responsible for the content or services of this site.

Find Locations1-800-232-0233 (TTY 888-720-7489)
FDA EUA LetterFact SheetsFACT SHEET FOR PATIENTS, PARENTS, AND CAREGIVERSHOJA INFORMATIVA PARA PACIENTES, PADRES Y CUIDADORES FICHE D’INFORMATION POUR LES PATIENTS,
LES PARENTS ET LES SOIGNANTS
FOLHETO INFORMATIVO PARA DOENTES,
PAIS E PRESTADORES DE CUIDADOS
صحيفة الحقائق للمرضى واآلباء ومقدمي الرعايةFACT SHEET FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDERSHOJA INFORMATIVA PARA PROVEEDORES
DE ATENCIÓN MÉDICA
FICHE D’INFORMATION DESTINÉE AUX PROFESSIONNELS DE SANTÉ FICHA INFORMATIVA PARA PRESTADORES
DE CUIDADOS DE SAÚDE
صحيفة الحقائق الخاصة بمقدمي الرعاية الصحية
Healthcare Provider Website

Menu

HomeHow to TakePossible Side EffectsFrequently Asked QuestionsResources
Frequently Asked Questions

PAXLOVID™ (nirmatrelvir tablets; ritonavir tablets) has not been approved, but has been authorized for emergency use by FDA under an EUA, for the treatment of mild-to-moderate COVID-19 in adults and pediatric patients (12 years of age and older weighing at least 40 kg) with positive results of direct SARS-CoV-2 viral testing, and who are at high risk for progression to severe COVID-19, including hospitalization or death. 

The emergency use of PAXLOVID is only authorized for the duration of the declaration that circumstances exist justifying the authorization of the emergency use of drugs and biological products during the COVID-19 pandemic under Section 564(b)(1) of the Act, 21 U.S.C. § 360bbb-3(b)(1), unless the declaration is terminated or authorization revoked sooner.

Open All What is an Emergency Use Authorization?

According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) is a mechanism to facilitate the availability and use of medical countermeasures during public health emergencies, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic. Under an emergency use authorization, the FDA may allow the use of unapproved medical products, or unapproved uses of approved medical products, in an emergency to diagnose, treat, or prevent serious or life-threatening diseases or conditions when certain statutory criteria have been met, including that there are no adequate, approved, and available alternatives. Taking into consideration input from the FDA, manufacturers decide whether and when to submit an emergency use authorization request to the FDA. Once submitted, the FDA will evaluate an emergency use authorization request and determine whether the relevant statutory criteria are met, taking into account the totality of the scientific evidence that is available to the FDA.

What does an EUA of PAXLOVID™ (nirmatrelvir tablets; ritonavir tablets) mean? 

PAXLOVID is an investigational medicine used to treat mild-to-moderate COVID-19 in adults and children [12 years of age and older weighing at least 88 pounds (40 kg)] with positive results of direct SARS-CoV-2 viral testing, and who are at high risk for progression to severe COVID-19, including hospitalization or death. PAXLOVID is investigational because it is still being studied. There is limited information about the safety and effectiveness of using PAXLOVID to treat people with mild-to-moderate COVID-19. The FDA has authorized the emergency use of PAXLOVID for the treatment of mild-to-moderate COVID-19 in adults and children [12 years of age and older weighing at least 88 pounds (40 kg)] with a positive test for the virus that causes COVID-19, and who are at high risk for progression to severe COVID-19, including hospitalization or death, under an EUA.

Is PAXLOVID appropriate for me?

Speak to your healthcare provider to determine if PAXLOVID is appropriate for you. PAXLOVID is not an FDA-approved medicine in the United States. PAXLOVID is an investigational medicine used to treat mild-to-moderate COVID-19 in adults and children [12 years of age and older weighing at least 88 pounds (40 kg)] with positive results of direct SARS-CoV-2 viral testing, and who are at high risk for progression to severe COVID-19, including hospitalization or death. 

​​​​​​​Talk to your healthcare provider about your options or if you have any questions. It is your choice to take PAXLOVID.

Who should not take PAXLOVID?

Do not take PAXLOVID if: 

  • You are allergic to nirmatrelvir, ritonavir, or any of the ingredients in PAXLOVID
  • You are taking any of the following medicines:
  • alfuzosin
  • amiodarone
  • apalutamide
  • carbamazepine
  • clozapine
  • colchicine
  • dihydroergotamine
  • dronedarone
  • eletriptan
  • eplerenone
  • ergotamine
  • finerenone
  • flecainide
  • flibanserin
  • ivabradine
  • lomitapide
  • lovastatin
  • lumacaftor/ivacaftor 
  • lurasidone
  • methylergonovine
  • midazolam (oral)
  • naloxegol
  • pethidine
  • phenobarbital
  • phenytoin
  • pimozide
  • primidone
  • propafenone
  • quinidine
  • ranolazine
  • rifampin
  • St. John’s Wort (hypericum perforatum)
  • sildenafil (Revatio®) for pulmonary arterial hypertension
  • silodosin
  • simvastatin
  • tolvaptan
  • triazolam
  • ubrogepant
  • voclosporin

Taking PAXLOVID with these medicines may cause serious or life-threatening side effects or affect how PAXLOVID works. 

These are not the only medicines that may cause serious side effects if taken with PAXLOVID. PAXLOVID may increase or decrease the levels of multiple other medicines. It is very important to tell your healthcare provider about all of the medicines you are taking because additional laboratory tests or changes in the dose of your other medicines may be necessary while you are taking PAXLOVID. Your healthcare provider may also tell you about specific symptoms to watch out for that may indicate that you need to stop or decrease the dose of some of your other medicines.

What type of COVID-19 test is required before PAXLOVID can be prescribed?

You can take any available FDA-authorized COVID-19 viral test (eg, RT-PCR, rapid antigen, etc) to determine if you have COVID-19. Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a viral test checks specimens from the nose or mouth and can be performed in a laboratory, at a testing site, at home, or anywhere else.

If you test positive for COVID-19, speak to a healthcare provider as soon as possible. 

For more information on COVID-19 testing, see the CDC's "COVID-19 Testing: What You Need To Know" web page.*

*This link will take you to a web page that is owned and operated by the CDC. Pfizer is not responsible for the content or   services of this site.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider to determine if PAXLOVID is right for me?

If you test positive for COVID-19, tell your healthcare provider about your symptoms as soon as possible.

Tell your healthcare provider if you: have any allergies; have a liver or kidney disease; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant; are breastfeeding a child; or have any serious illness. Some medicines may interact with PAXLOVID and may cause serious side effects. Tell your healthcare provider about all of the medicines that you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for a list of medicines that interact with PAXLOVID. Do not start taking a new medicine without telling your healthcare provider. 

​​​​​​Tell your healthcare provider if you are taking combined hormonal contraceptive. PAXLOVID may affect how your birth control pills work. Females who are able to become pregnant should use another effective alternative form of contraception or an additional barrier method of contraception. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have any questions about contraceptive methods that might be right for you. 

Who is at high risk for severe COVID-19? 

People of all ages or groups can be infected with COVID-19. Some people are more likely than others to get severe COVID‑19, which can lead to hospitalization or death, even when symptoms start off as mild.

Some people are at a greater risk of COVID-19 becoming severe because they meet certain criteria, including where they live, work, or any barriers to health care that they may have. This includes many people from racial and ethnic minority groups and people with disabilities. 

In addition, having one or more of the following factors puts you at high risk of getting severe COVID-19*:

  • 65 years or older
  • Cancer
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Chronic liver disease
  • Chronic lung disease (including moderate-to-severe asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], emphysema, and chronic bronchitis)
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Dementia or other neurological conditions
  • Diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2)
  • Disabilities (including Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder [ADHD], learning disabilities, and intellectual/developmental disabilities)
  • Heart conditions
  • HIV infection
  • Immunocompromised condition or weakened immune system
  • Mental health conditions (including mood disorders, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and depression)
  • Overweight
  • Physically inactive 
  • Pregnant or recently pregnant
  • Sickle cell disease or thalassemia
  • Smoking, current or former
  • Solid organ or blood stem cell transplant
  • Cerebrovascular disease or have had a stroke
  • Substance use disorders (such as alcohol, opioid, or cocaine use disorder)
  • Tuberculosis


*This list does not include all possible conditions that may put you at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19. If you have questions about a condition not included on this list, talk to your healthcare provider. Visit the CDC website for the latest information and the full list of high risk factors: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-with-medical-conditions.html.
 
This link will take you to a website that is owned and operated by the CDC. Pfizer is not responsible for the content or services of this site.

How do I get PAXLOVID?

PAXLOVID may be prescribed for an individual patient by physicians, advanced practice registered nurses, and physician assistants that are licensed or authorized under state law to prescribe drugs. State-licensed pharmacists may also prescribe PAXLOVID under certain conditions.

What is the Test-to-Treat initiative?

The Test-to-Treat initiative* can help you get tested for COVID-19 and, if appropriate, receive treatment all in the same location. Find a location near you here* or call 1-800-232-0233 (TTY 888-720-7489).

*These links will take you to websites that are owned and operated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Pfizer is not responsible for the content or services of these sites.
​​

Where can I get my prescription of PAXLOVID filled?

You can only get PAXLOVID with a prescription from physicians, advanced practice registered nurses, and physician assistants that are licensed or authorized under state law to prescribe drugs. State-licensed pharmacists may also prescribe PAXLOVID under certain conditions. If prescribed, speak with your healthcare provider if you have additional questions.

Locations of publicly available COVID-19 therapeutics can be found by using the Test-to-Treat Locator.*

*This link will take you to a database that is owned and operated by the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services (HHS). Pfizer is not responsible for the content or services of this site.

How much does PAXLOVID cost? 

As part of the Emergency Use Authorization, the U.S. Government has purchased PAXLOVID from Pfizer and is making it available to patients at no charge. Other administrative fees may apply.​​​​​​​

How soon after receiving a positive test for SARS-CoV-2 should I initiate PAXLOVID treatment?

The 5-day treatment course of PAXLOVID should be initiated as soon as possible after a diagnosis of COVID-19 has been made and within 5 days of symptom onset. 

What if I receive expired PAXLOVID?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a shelf-life extension for PAXLOVID from 12 months to 18 months. If you have an expiration date listed below, please see the chart to find the new expiration date.

Labeled Expiration Date Extended Expiration Date
July 2022 January 2023
August 2022 February 2023
November 2022 May 2023
December 2022 June 2023
January 2023 July 2023
February 2023 August 2023
March 2023 September 2023
April 2023 October 2023
May 2023 November 2023
How do I take PAXLOVID?
  • PAXLOVID consists of 2 medicines: nirmatrelvir tablets and ritonavir tablets. The tablets are taken together 2 times each day for 5 days.
    • Nirmatrelvir is an oval, pink tablet
    • Ritonavir is a white or off-white tablet
    • PAXLOVID is available in 2 dose packs. Your healthcare provider will prescribe the PAXLOVID dose pack that is right for you
    • If you have kidney disease, your healthcare provider may prescribe a lower dose. Talk to your healthcare provider to make sure you receive the correct dose pack
  • Swallow the tablets whole. Do not chew, break, or crush the tablets
  • Take PAXLOVID with or without food
  • Do not stop taking PAXLOVID without talking to your healthcare provider, even if you feel better
  • If you are taking a ritonavir- or cobicistat-containing medicine to treat hepatitis C or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), you should continue to take your medicine as prescribed by your healthcare provider


Talk to your healthcare provider if you do not feel better or if you feel worse after 5 days.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of PAXLOVID within 8 hours of the time it is usually taken, take it as soon as you remember. If you miss a dose by more than 8 hours, skip the missed dose and take the next dose at your regular time. Do not take 2 doses of PAXLOVID at the same time. 
​​​​​

What if I take too much PAXLOVID?

If you take too much PAXLOVID, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.

Do I need to continue the treatment if I feel better before completing the full treatment course?

Do not stop taking PAXLOVID without talking to your healthcare provider, even if you feel better. 

What are the possible side effects of taking PAXLOVID?

Allergic Reactions. Allergic reactions can happen in people taking PAXLOVID, even after only 1 dose. Stop taking PAXLOVID and call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms of an allergic reaction:

  • hives
  • trouble swallowing or breathing
  • swelling of the mouth, lips, or face
  • throat tightness
  • hoarseness
  • skin rash


Liver problems: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these signs and symptoms of liver problems: loss of appetite, yellowing of your skin and the whites your eyes (jaundice), dark-colored urine, pale-colored stools and itchy skin, or stomach area (abdominal) pain. 

Resistance to HIV medicines: If you have untreated HIV infection, PAXLOVID may lead to some HIV medicines not working as well in the future.

Other possible side effects include: altered sense of taste, diarrhea, high blood pressure, muscle aches, abdominal pain, nausea, feeling generally unwell.

These are not all the possible side effects of PAXLOVID. Not many people have taken PAXLOVID. Serious and unexpected side effects may happen. PAXLOVID is still being studied, so it is possible that all of the risks are not known at this time.

Report side effects or problems with the appearance or packaging of PAXLOVID to FDA MedWatch at www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088 or you can report side effects to Pfizer Inc. at the contact information provided below.

Website

Fax number

Telephone number

Related Pages Resources How to Take
How to verify your tablets are authentic

PAXLOVID must be prescribed by a licensed healthcare provider and supplied by a government approved pharmacy or medical facility.

Authentic PAXLOVID, from Pfizer Inc., will include the Pfizer name on the label and will be packaged in 5 aluminum push-through blister cards. Individual doses are not for sale. PAXLOVID will be packaged in a rectangular carton. The carton has a colorless, glossy coating that contains a repeated pattern of the Pfizer name and logo all over, and these repeating features are seen in a contrasting matte finish.

PAXLOVID consists of tablets for a 5-day oral treatment regimen, with morning and evening doses.

NOTE: If you are a patient with moderate kidney disease, you may receive a carton with daily blister cards that have been altered to ensure you receive the correct dose.

To help determine whether the tablets are authentic, look for specific text on each side of the tablets

Tablet

Text

nirmatrelvir

Front: 3CL | Back: PFE

ritonavir, manufactured by AbbVie

Front: iconNK | Back: No text

ritonavir, manufactured by
Hetero

Front: H | Back: R9

Pfizer is committed to patient safety and ensuring that people have accurate information about the investigational drug PAXLOVID, including how it is accessed and administered. We are actively monitoring for fraudulent offers of illegitimate PAXLOVID to protect patients from products that might be dangerous and lead to serious and life-threatening harm.

If you suspect the product you have received may be counterfeit, contact us at 1‑800‑438‑1985 or visit www.pfizersafetyreporting.com.

Not actual size
For more
information

Contact One of the Following Groups

For Medical Information visit www.pfizermedicalinformation.com or call 1‑800‑438‑1985

For General Product Inquiries call 1‑877‑C19PACK (1‑877‑219‑7225)

AUTHORIZED USE

​​​​​​The FDA has authorized the emergency use of PAXLOVID, an investigational medicine, for the treatment of mild-to-moderate COVID-19 in adults and children (12 years of age and older weighing at least 88 pounds [40 kg]) with a positive test for the virus that causes COVID-19, and who are at high risk for progression to severe COVID-19, including hospitalization or death, under an EUA.

PAXLOVID is investigational because it is still being studied. There is limited information about the safety and effectiveness of using PAXLOVID to treat people with mild-to-moderate COVID-19.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Expand
​​​​​​Before taking PAXLOVID, tell your healthcare provider if you:
  • Have any allergies
  • Have liver or kidney disease 
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
  • Are breastfeeding a child
  • Have any serious illnesses

Some medicines may interact with PAXLOVID and may cause serious side effects.
  • Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.
  • Your healthcare provider can tell you if it is safe to take PAXLOVID with other medicines.
  • You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for a list of medicines that interact with PAXLOVID.
  • Do not start taking a new medicine without telling your healthcare provider.
     
Tell your healthcare provider if you are taking combined hormonal contraceptive. ​​​​​​PAXLOVID may affect how your birth control pills work. Females who are able to become pregnant should use another effective alternative form of contraception or an additional barrier method of contraception. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have any questions about contraceptive methods that might be right for you.
     
​​​​​​HOW TO TAKE PAXLOVID
  • PAXLOVID consists of 2 medicines: nirmatrelvir and ritonavir. The 2 medicines are taken together 2 times each day for 5 days.
    • Nirmatrelvir is an oval, pink tablet. 
    • Ritonavir is a white or off-white tablet.
  • PAXLOVID is available in 2 Dose Packs. Your healthcare provider will prescribe the PAXLOVID Dose Pack that is right for you.
  • If you have kidney disease, your healthcare provider may prescribe a lower dose. Talk to your healthcare provider to make sure you receive the correct Dose Pack.
  • Do not remove your PAXLOVID tablets from the blister card before you are ready to take your dose.
  • Take your first dose of PAXLOVID in the Morning or Evening, depending on when you pick up your prescription, or as recommended by your healthcare provider.
  • Swallow the tablets whole. Do not chew, break, or crush the tablets.
  • Take PAXLOVID with or without food.  
  • Do not stop taking PAXLOVID without talking to your healthcare provider, even if you feel better.
  • If you miss a dose of PAXLOVID within 8 hours of the time it is usually taken, take it as soon as you remember. If you miss the dose by more than 8 hours, skip the missed dose and take the next dose at your regular time. Do not take morning and evening doses of PAXLOVID at the same time. 
  • If you take too much PAXLOVID, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.​
  • If you are taking a ritonavir- or cobicistat-containing medicine to treat hepatitis C or Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), you should continue to take your medicine as prescribed by your healthcare provider.

​​​​​​Talk to your healthcare provider if you do not feel better or if you feel worse after 5 days. 
​​​​
Do not take PAXLOVID if:
  • You are allergic to nirmatrelvir, ritonavir, or any of the ingredients in PAXLOVID.
  • You are taking any of the following medicines:
    • alfuzosin
    • amiodarone
    • apalutamide
    • carbamazepine
    • clozapine
    • colchicine
    • dihydroergotamine
    • dronedarone
    • eletriptan
    • eplerenone
    • ergotamine
    • finerenone
    • flecainide
    • flibanserin
    • ivabradine
    • lomitapide
    • lovastatin
    • lumacaftor/ivacaftor
    • lurasidone
    • methylergonovine
    • midazolam (oral)
    • naloxegol
    • pethidine
    • phenobarbital
    • phenytoin
    • pimozide
    • primidone
    • propafenone
    • quinidine
    • ranolazine
    • rifampin
    • St. John’s Wort (hypericum perforatum)
    • sildenafil (Revatio®) for pulmonary arterial hypertension
    • silodosin
    • simvastatin
    • tolvaptan
    • triazolam
    • ubrogepant
    • voclosporin

Taking PAXLOVID with these medicines may cause serious or life-threatening side effects or affect how PAXLOVID works.
These are not the only medicines that may cause serious side effects if taken with PAXLOVID. PAXLOVID may increase or decrease the levels of multiple other medicines. It is very important to tell your healthcare provider about all medicines you are taking because additional laboratory tests or changes in the dose of your other medicines may be necessary while you are taking PAXLOVID. Your healthcare provider may also tell you about specific symptoms to watch out for that may indicate that you need to stop or decrease the dose of some of your other medicines.
Possible side effects of PAXLOVID are:
  • Allergic Reactions. Allergic reactions can happen in people taking PAXLOVID, even after only 1 dose. Stop taking PAXLOVID and call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms of an allergic reaction:
    • hives
    • trouble swallowing or breathing
    • swelling of the mouth, lips, or face
    • throat tightness
    • hoarseness
    • skin rash
  • Liver Problems. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these signs and symptoms of liver problems: loss of appetite, yellowing of your skin and the whites of eyes (jaundice), dark-colored urine, pale-colored stools and itchy skin, or stomach area (abdominal) pain.
  • Resistance to HIV Medicines. If you have untreated HIV infection, PAXLOVID may lead to some HIV medicines not working as well in the future.
  • Other possible side effects include:
    • altered sense of taste
    • diarrhea
    • high blood pressure
    • muscle aches
    • abdominal pain
    • nausea
    • feeling generally unwell
These are not all the possible side effects of PAXLOVID. Not many people have taken PAXLOVID. Serious and unexpected side effects may happen. PAXLOVID is still being studied, so it is possible that all of the risks are not known at this time.There is no experience treating pregnant women or breastfeeding mothers with PAXLOVID. For a mother and unborn baby, the benefit of taking PAXLOVID may be greater than the risk from the treatment. It is recommended that you use effective barrier contraception or do not have sexual activity while taking PAXLOVID. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, discuss your options and specific situation with your healthcare provider.Contact your healthcare provider if you have any side effects that bother you or do not go away. Report side effects or problems with the appearance or packaging of PAXLOVID to FDA MedWatch at www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088, or you can report side effects to Pfizer Inc. at www.pfizersafetyreporting.com, by fax at 1-866-635-8337, or by calling 1-800-438-1985.Please see Fact Sheet for Healthcare Providers and Fact Sheet for Patients, Parents, and Caregivers.